Tag: Electric Energy

WeDo Class 2: Programming Sensors!

General Topics: Engineering, Robotics, Electric Energy, Electronics, Programming
Grade Level: 2-3

In this activity we explored more of Lego’s WeDo software and continued to expand on our robot!

The students began by teaming up again to create another Milo robot so that everyone had an individual robot (the ones built last class and those built this class). By this class the students knew the procedure and were quick to build and quick to explore.

Once built, the students were then asked to perform the motion sensor code and explain what is being observed. We explained the sensor and gave a simple overview of feedback systems with robots.

The students then built the tilt sensor robot. This robot used the tilt sensor to gain feedback and project a word onto the screen of the software. While it was initially a bit hard for the students to understand how to make the code work, the students were able to pick it up. We then taught them how to make not only a word appear on their screen based off of the direction of tilt, but how to make their robots move based off of it, allowing a joystick motion!

This class we learned: 

  • How to use the WeDo software
  • How to create from Lego pieces
  • How to code using visual programming (the WeDo software)
  • How open feedback systems work in robots
  • About the tilt sensor and motion sensor

Things to keep in mind for future activities: 

  • Students didn’t understand the tilt sensor much without the visual feedback from the moving robot, always linking the code to robot movements/changes is ideal

 

 

WeDo Class 1: Building Robots!

General Topics: Engineering, Robotics, Electric Energy, Electronics, Programming
Grade Level: 2-3

In this activity we explored Lego’s WeDo software! We began by seeing a quick overview of the software and learning how the processes we will be accomplishing through it can help us explore the world around us!

When this was done, we handed the students their building supplies (all pieces to make the Milo robot were separated to make it easier for students) and asked them to create Milo the robot! The students worked in teams of two and together fit the pieces to make a final robot.

With the robot built, students were then shown how to make a basic forward movement. The students then had free roam to explore the software however they desired! This open creation process was great and students learned so much of the software just by exploration. They changed the lights on their robot, they made it make different noises, and had their codes end with their voices!

After a while of exploring, the students were then asked to follow the instructions to create an attachment with a distance sensor! The students added the sensor to the robot and then created a small flower for the robot to spot. Once more, students added their own creative twists to the code.

It was a great lesson on building and coding!


This class we learned: 

  • How to use the WeDo software
  • How to create from Lego pieces
  • How to code using visual programming (the WeDo software)

Things to keep in mind for future activities: 

  • Students picked up the software very quickly! Next time we can be more ambitious with the lesson plan

 

Making little robots and using breadboards!

General Topics: Engineering, Basic Robotics, Electric Energy, Electronics, Circuits
Grade Level: 2-3

In this activity we explored the process of making small robots and learning how to use switches and breadboards! This exercise taught us how to prototype circuits by using a breadboard and teach the fundamentals of creating small devices from electrical components! Students were then able to decorate their little robots.

Each student started off making the small robot, placing the robot legs on the cardboard and placing them in such a way that when the motor vibrates the robot will move back and forth and shake. When complete with the robot base, the motor was glued on along with the small off center propeller. This propeller also was purposely made uneven to allow for more movement when the motor was turned on.

The students then put the robots aside as they worked on the switches! The students made a stylish paperclip-switch to use for the breadboards.

Next, the breadboards! Together we learned to wire the breadboards and understand the orientation of the pins. We used the breadboard to wire up lighting a small LED light, then we added in our little robots and bam! They were moving!

 


This class we learned: 

  • How to use a breadboard 
  • How a circuit works
  • How to make a simple robot
  • How to wire multiple items on a breadboard from the same power source

Things to keep in mind for future activities: 

  • Using a breadboard took a little while to pick up and understand, but saying exactly where to add the wires in (ex: J22) made it easy to follow!
  • More time would be ideal for removing the wiring from the breadboard and using it just on the cardboard so the students could take it home
  • Soldering the wires is more ideal and sturdy than tape